Source: Official Guide Revised GRE 2nd Ed. Part 9; Section 4; #13

1

The passage mentions which of the following

The passage mentions which of the following as being a characteristic of seasonal ice? Arctic sea ice comes in two varieties. Seasonal ice forms in winter and then melts in summer, while perennial ice persists year-round. To the untrained eye, all sea ice looks similar, but by licking it, one can estimate how long a particular piece has been floating around. When ice begins to form in seawater, it forces out salt, which has no place in the crystal structure. As the ice gets thicker, the rejected salt collects in tiny pockets of brine too highly concentrated to freeze. A piece of first-year ice will taste salty. Eventually, if the ice survives, these pockets of brine drain out through fine, veinlike channels, and the ice becomes fresher; multiyear ice can even be melted and drunk. It is similar in appearance to perennial ice., It is typically filled with fine, veinlike channels., It tastes saltier than perennial ice.

2 Explanations

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Abhinav Shahu

I am not getting why option C is correct.
The seasonal ice is the ice which doesn't long whole year (as it forms in winter & then melts in summer). So when the author is saying that "A piece of first-year ice will taste salty...melted and drunk.". He is talking about perennial ice not seasonal ice. Also here first-year ice means that It has been 1 year since the (perennial) ice has been formed. So it can't be seasonal ice. Am i correct in understanding?

Feb 3, 2017 • Comment

Adam

Hi Abhinav,

Good question. "First-year ice" does not necessarily mean "ice that has lasted for one year." It can (and in this case does) mean "ice that is less than one year old."

We know that seasonal ice will be saltier than perennial ice because the salt only leaves the ice after a long period of time:

"Eventually, if the ice survives, these pockets of brine drain out through fine, veinlike channels, and the ice becomes fresher..."

Since seasonal ice never lasts a whole year, it will always be salty.

Feb 3, 2017 • Reply

1

Gravatar Chris Lele, Magoosh Tutor

Dec 8, 2012 • Comment

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