Source: Official Guide Revised GRE 1st Ed. Part 6; Set 1; #2

22

In the figure above, squares PQRV and VRST

In the figure above, squares PQRV and VRST have sides of length 6. Quantity A The area of the shaded region Quantity B 36 Quantity A is greater., Quantity B is greater., The two quantities are equal., The relationship cannot be determined from the information given.

3 Explanations

2

Adel Alzahrani

Hi
I can't see the full text of the question nor the figure. the only thing I see is "In the figure above, squares PQRV and VRST". How would I resolve this issue? It seems it happens with all the questions set.

Jul 28, 2018 • Comment

David Recine, Magoosh Tutor

Hi Adel,

You should be able to see the full text of the question and answer choices if you're logged into your Magoosh GRE premium account. If you log in and still can't see that full text, email help@magoosh.com, and one of our tech support people can help you resolve that issue.

As for the figure, Magoosh chooses not to include actual visuals in its forum, for a number of reasons. Since this forum is meant to be a companion to the ETS book, you can view the figure by looking in the first edition of the Official Guide to the Revised GRE in Part 6, Set 1, question 2.

As luck would have it, this is a pretty poplar question, so you can also see the figure online on another forum, the GRE Prep Club forum: https://greprepclub.com/forum/topic1123.html

Jul 29, 2018 • Reply

3

Saverio Ungania

Why are you assuming that the rectangle is splitted in half? There is no evidence about it, the question just says "In the figure above, squares PQRV and VRST have sides of lenght 6". But we have no idea whether the line splits in half the rectangle. It could pass through a point near the center, but not necesseraily in the center, since the questions doesn't say anything to us. Do we have to assume this? And why?

May 18, 2015 • Comment

Jonathan , Magoosh Tutor

Hi Saverio,
We know for certain. We have two squares with side of length 6 that share a common side, which is the line that splits the rectangle (RV). Since these are squares, all the sides have length 6. Since QR, RS, PV and VT all must have length 6, we know that the rectangle is split in half.

Jun 10, 2015 • Reply

Cecilia C Hernandez

How we can assume that PS splits the rectangle into two equal triangles, PQS and PTS?

Jul 18, 2015 • Reply

Jonathan , Magoosh Tutor

Hi Cecilia. Please see my response to Saverio above: We have two squares with side of length 6 that share a common side, which is the line that splits the rectangle (RV). Since these are squares, all the sides have length 6. Since QR, RS, PV and VT all must have length 6, we know that the rectangle is split in half. The resulting triangles are both right triangles with smaller sides of 6 and 12, so they must be equal.

Jul 27, 2015 • Reply

2

Gravatar Chris Lele, Magoosh Tutor

Oct 6, 2012 • Comment

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